Pay

About HMOs

House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) are generally houses split into bedsits, shared houses such as student houses or divided into some self-contained flats.

A HMO could be:

  • A house or flat which is occupied by¬†3 or more people who form 2 or more households, and who lack or share basic amenities, or;
  • A house which has been converted entirely into bedsits or other non-self-contained accommodation, which is occupied by 3 or more people who form 2 or more households, and who share kitchen, bathroom or toilet facilities or;
  • A converted house which contains a mix of self-contained and non self-contained accommodation (for example a flat within the house does not contain a kitchen, bathroom and toilet) and which is occupied by 3 or more people who form 2 or more households or;
  • A building which is converted entirely into self-contained flats if the conversion did not meet the standards of the 1991 Building Regulations and more than one-third of the flats are let on short-term tenancies.

To be an HMO, the property must be used as the tenants' only or main residence. Properties let to students and migrant workers will be treated as their only or main residence.

Look at the housing Act 2004 on legislation.gov.uk for more details.

Different types of HMOs

Non licensable HMO:

  • A house or flat which occupied 3 or more people who form 2 or more households, and who lack or share basic amenities.
  • A house converted into bedsits or other non-self-contained accommodation. Occupied 3 or more people who form 2 or more households. Who share kitchen, bathroom or toilet facilities.

Licensable HMO:

  • A house or flat which occupied 5 or more people forming 2 or more households, and who lack or share basic amenities.

Certain blocks of flats:

  • A converted house which contains a mix of self-contained and non-self-contained accommodation. For example a flat within the house does not contain a kitchen, bathroom and toilet. And occupied 3 or more people who form 2 or more households.
  • A building converted into self-contained flats. Where the conversion did not meet the standards of the 1991 Building Regulations. More than one-third of the flats are let on short-term tenancies.

HMO Standards

A HMO will have to meet certain standards including:

  • Means of escape in case of fire and other fire precautions.
  • Amenities such as kitchens, bathrooms toilets and wash hand basins.
  • Overcrowding with regards to the number and size of rooms.
  • General fitness for occupation.
  • Management standards.
  • Gas safety.
  • Furniture fire safety.

HMO regulations

Each HMO type has a set of regulations.

The Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation (England) Regulations 2006 on legislation.gov.uk.

The Licensing and Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation and Other Houses (Miscellaneous Provisions) (England) Regulations 2006 on legislation.gov.uk.

The Houses in Multiple Occupation (Certain Blocks of Flats) (Modifications to the Housing Act 2004 and Transitional Provisions for section 257 HMOs) (England) Regulations 2007 on legislation.gov.uk.

HMO licensing

Read about licensable HMOs.

Positive Feedback Okay Feedback Negative Feedback
Web page feedback